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PBRC is an educational, funding and listing resource for owners
and caretakers of American Pit Bull Terriers, American Staffordshire Terriers, Staffordshire Bull Terriers, and any mixes thereof.
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Dog Breeding and Pet Homelessness  

It is estimated that up to 200 Pit Bulls are killed EVERY DAY in Los Angeles County, CA, shelters alone because there are not enough homes for them. Imagine the number across the entire United States...

Many people have no idea how desperate the situation is for millions of homeless companion animals, especially pit bulls. These dogs have more against them than any other breed. They are regularly maligned by the media, feared and misunderstood by the public, too often owned by abusive or irresponsible individuals, innocent victims of kill policies in shelters, and the target of breed specific legislation and breed bans.

Every year over 20 million animals end up homeless. Over 15 million of them are killed (euthanized is the nice term) in dog shelters. Roughly 30% of impounded pets are reclaimed, adopted or rescued. The remaining 70% are destroyed. Many more die from disease, starvation, animal attacks and cars! Anyone who sees these statistics must agree that not neutering an animal is irresponsible!

For homeless pit bulls the death sentence is almost always automatic.

"The pit bull population has now risen to 40% of all the dogs in 12 shelters in Los Angeles. THAT MEANS THAT ALMOST HALF OF THE ENTIRE LOS ANGELES DOG POPULATION IS PITS OR PIT MIXES! Most are strays, tossed out like dirty laundry. It's heartbreaking." (Villalobos Rescue Center regarding the situation in Los Angeles, CA.)

Each homeless pit bull that dies in the street or sits hopeless in a shelter is the product of a breeder, either intentionally or accidentally...

Anyone who cares about these dogs should try to save a homeless pit bull before adding more dogs to a completely saturated market.

Remember that most animal shelters have a no-adopt policy for pit bulls. These dogs are automatically destroyed just for being pit bulls, even the puppies! If you can't find homes for all the pups your dog may produce, you WILL be responsible for the deaths of the remaining puppies. You will also be responsible for each of the other pit bulls who forfeit their chance and give their lives to make room for your pups.

The shelters that do adopt out pit bulls are completely overloaded and must often euthanize them because they are not able to find them good homes. The lucky ones spend months, sometimes years, rotting behind bars on a cold cement floor.

Before you breed, we urge you to volunteer at your local animal shelter so you can witness pet homelessness first hand. See how many wonderful pit bulls end up there and leave in a barrel.

If this doesn't change your mind about the number of dogs out there and you decide to breed anyway, at least be responsible about it.

Responsible breeders:

  • Breed only healthy, papered dogs that are free of genetic and temperament defects. They NEVER breed rescue dogs and dogs of unknown genetic background.
  • Ensure their pups won't end up in an animal shelters by finding safe, committed, responsible homes for each pup before they are conceived. This means potentially 8-12 homes!
  • Take back their dogs if the homes don't work out (for the entire life of the dog). This means dogs could come back to you years after you sold them.
  • Spay/neuter their puppies prior to adoption so they won't contribute to the overpopulation problem.

Remember, for every pup you produce, another one dies in a shelter.

Responsible breeding vs. backyard breeding

You still want to be a breeder?